Radiologic error caused failure to diagnose

Radiologic error caused failure to diagnose

News reports that a $15M medical malpractice award in a radiology malpractice case will stand. The verdict was appealed as excessive, however the court denied the appeal stating that the "court cannot and does not find that awards of $14 [million] and $1 [million] respectively for the loss of 36.2 years of life expectancy and consortium of a formerly vibrant, competent and engaged wife, mother and professional woman is excessive in the least.”

In this instance, a radiologist missed a tumor on a CT-Scan. The tumor went undiagnosed for roughly 17-months. When the tumor was eventually detected, tests revealed that she had stage 4 rectal cancer.

Misdiagnosis – or the failure to timely diagnose a condition – is one of the leading sources of medical negligence. The best chance for an optimal outcome is a proper diagnosis, so that treatment can begin. A common source of misdiagnosis is radiologic error – when the wrong tests are performed or when tests are misinterpreted. When these errors occur and result in a delay of diagnosis, a patient’s potential for an optimal recovery diminishes. While in some instances, the outcome would not have changed had the diagnosis be made sooner, in other cases, the delay can have devastating consequences.

Here, evidence presented at trial showed that had the cancer been caught at an earlier stage, the woman could have been treated and have a better chance at survival.

For more information or if you or a loved one has suffered harm due to a medical error or mistake, please contact the experienced San Diego medical malpractice lawyers at Bostwick & Peterson, LLP for an immediate consultation.
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